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Graduate Program

Though subject to varied emphases and disciplinary investments, Diaspora in contemporary thought involves an understanding of the shifting relations between homelands and host nations from the perspective of those who have moved, whether voluntarily or not. Diaspora emphasizes the inescapable lived experience of many migrant communities of negotiating forms of existence and self-understanding that are often translocal and exceed the boundaries of the nation-state. Questions of nostalgia, of the dynamics of co-ethnic identification, of the politics of homeland and host nation, and of the inter-generational shifts in responses to all these are central to studies of diaspora. Transnationalism, on the other hand, focuses on flows and counterflows and the multistriated connections they give rise to.  It encompasses in its ambit not just the movement of people but also concepts of citizenship and multinational governance, the resources of information technology, and the realities of the global marketplace, among others. These multiple phenomena are then taken to exemplify the nature and intensities of the flows that shape the modern world. Taken together, the concepts of Diaspora and Transnationalism promise a broad understanding of the full spectrum of implications that derive from the reality of the vast movements of populations, goods, ideas, images, technologies, and finance in the world today.

The Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Program in Diaspora and Transnational Studies is designed to bring together both social science and humanities at  perspectives at the graduate level to augment our already existing tri-campus undergraduate program and to contribute to increased research collaboration among participants in the program. It has been set up in response to popular demand by advanced students of the current DTS undergraduate program as well as the many expressions of interest from students keen on thorough graduate training in the field from within Canada and well beyond. The Collaborative Program is distinctive by being interdisciplinary as well as comparative. Whilst raising questions about diasporic communities in Canada, this is not be the primary focus of the Collaborative Program.  Rather, the Canadian example is a means towards understanding the nature of diaspora and transnationalism elsewhere in North America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Global South.  

COLLABORATING PROGRAMS AND DEGREES
Anthropology - MA, Msc, PhD
Cinema Studies - MA
Comparative Literature - MA, PhD
Criminology and Sociolegal Studies - MA, PhD
Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies - MA, PhD
English - MA, PhD
Geography - MA, MSc, PhD
German Literature, Culture and Theory - MA, PhD
History - MA, PhD
History of Art - MA, PhD
Near and Middle Eastern Civiliazations - MA, PhD
Political Science - MA, PhD
Religion - MA, PhD
Slavic Languages and Literatures - MA, PhD
Sociology - MA, PhD
Sociology in Education (OISE) - MA, MEd, EdD, PhD
Spanish - MA, PhD
Women and Gender Studies - MA

SUPPORTING UNITS
Centre for Jewish Studies


MASTER'S LEVEL

Admission Requirements
•   Applicants are enrolled in a participating master’s degree program in the graduate unit in which the research is conducted, which is known as the participating home graduate unit. The applicant must meet the admission requirements of both the home graduate unit and the collaborative program.

Program Requirements
•  Students must meet all respective degree requirements of the School of Graduate Studies and the participating unit.

•  Students must meet the requirements of the collaborative program as follows:

1. 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE) seminar in Comparative Research Methods in Diaspora and Transnational Studies. As part of the Research Methods seminar, students are required to submit an ethnographic, archival, or documentary paper on a diasporic community in Toronto or elsewhere.

2. 0.5 FCE Graduate Topics in Diaspora Studies (DTS 2000H). Course theme to be decided each year by the Program Committee. With the approval of the Program Director, a student may substitute a course from their home department for the DTS topics course.

3. The DTS collaborative components may be taken as electives for the purpose of satisfying home department requirements.

4. If the student undertakes a major paper or thesis in their home department, this will be on a topic in diaspora and transnational studies, approved by the Program Committee. A copy of the final thesis or project must be submitted to the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies.


DOCTORAL LEVEL

Admission Requirements
•   Applicants shall be enrolled in a participating doctoral degree program in the graduate unit in which the research is conducted, which is known as the participating home graduate unit. The applicant shall meet the admission requirements of both the home graduate unit and the collaborative program.
•   Students who complete the Collaborative Program at the master’s level will not be eligible for the program at the doctoral level.

Program Requirements
•  Students must meet all respective degree requirements of the School of Graduate Studies and the participating unit.

•  Students must meet the requirements of the collaborative program as follows:

1. 0.5 full-course equivalent (FCE) seminar in Comparative Research Methods in Diaspora and Transnational Studies. As part of the Research Methods seminar, students are required to submit an ethnographic, archival, or documentary paper on a diasporic community in Toronto or elsewhere.

2. 0.5 FCE Graduate Topics in Diaspora Studies (DTS 2000H). Course theme to be decided each year by the Program Committee. With the approval of the Program Director, a student may substitute a course from their home department for the DTS topics course.

3. The DTS collaborative components may be taken as electives for the purpose of satisfying home department requirements.

4. The student’s dissertation in their home department must be on a topic in diaspora and transnational studies, approved by the Program Committee. A copy of the final thesis or project must be submitted to the Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies.



APPLYING TO THE DTS COLLABORATIVE PROGRAM

Applications should contain the following:
- cv
- Academic transcript
- Statement of scholarly interest (2 pages maximum)
- Proof of admission to home department

Applications should be received by June 30, 2017 either via email to cdts@utoronto.ca or posted to:

Antonela Arhin, Ph.D.
Executive Officer
Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies
Jackman Humanities Building
170 St George Street, room 230
Toronto, ON M5R 2M8
Canada

Please note that we accept applications to our collaborative graduate program on a rolling basis until the day before classes start.

 

COURSE CALENDAR 2016-17

 

DTS1000H Comparative Research Methods in Diaspora and Transnationalism
Fall 2016, Tuesdays, 2-5 pm, Room JHB 235

This seminar will introduce students to a range of theories to do with diaspora and transnationalism from the humanities and the social sciences.  Core questions will include the methodological differences between diaspora and its many synonyms, such as migrant communities, exile, refugee etc.  The different emphases and overlaps between Migration Studies, Urban Studies, and Diaspora and Transnational Studies will also be pursued.

Instructor
Prof. Ken MacDonald


DTS2000H Regulation
Winter 2017, Mondays, 12-3pm, Room JHB 235

Constructs of globalization and transnationalism can generate the impression of a world of unfettered connectivity or frictionless mobility.  But the flow of ideas, bodies and capital is, of course, subject to myriad forms of formal and informal regulation.  This course examines regulation in the context of diasporic formations and transnational processes to reveal and interrogate the ways in which actors and actions shape the possible emergence of those formations and processes, and the sense of crisis that is revealed when informal appears to supersede formal regulation.


Instructor
Prof. Ken MacDonald

 




 

 

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